Category Archives: Itacoatiara

Pop Quiz

Who doesn't love a post-it cartoon?

The last few weeks I have been busy with testing, so I thought why not continue the trend with a little Brazilian trivia? The questions below are a collection of some random facts I have learned since coming here, so this is a fun way for me to share them. I’ll post the answer key in a day or two. And…I did my best to spell-check my Portuguese, but I’m sure there are mistakes. Forgive me, I’m still learning 😀

  1. Itacoatiara’s nickname is
    • A – Pedra Pintada (the painted rock)
    • B – Rio Claro (Clear River)
    • C – Grande Anaconda (big anaconda)
  2. Which of the following is not an Amazonian fruit?

    Name that fruit!

    • A – Cupuaçu
    • B – Goiaba
    • C – Pirarucu
    • D – Guaraná
  3. It is normal to eat your pizza smothered in
    • A – Ketchup
    • B – Mayonnaise
    • C – Chocolate
    • D – Condensed milk
    • E – All of the above
  4. A hand signal that DOESN’T mean sex is:
    • A – Thrusting your fingers downward, like tapping them on a table
    • B – Holding your hand up, palm outward, and closing your fingers into your palm repeatedly
    • C – Smacking the back of one hand into the palm of the other
    • D – Hitting the top of a closed fist with the palm of the other
  5. To summon a waitress/waiter, one should:
    • A – Whistle or “psiu”
    • B – Wave
    • C – Hiss “mossa!” at a great distance
    • D – Any of the above
  6. Which of the following common expressions is a swear word?
    • A – Puta que pariu!
    • B – Nossa!
    • C – Olha-là!
  7. What Brazilian league team does Fisk sponsor?
    • A – Flamengo
    • B – Corinthians
    • C – Vasco
    • D – São Paulo
  8. Which of the following is NOT a type of music?
    • A – Forró
    • B – Pagode
    • C – Purão Alemão
    • D – MPB
  9. To confirm with the Polícia Federal that you are in the country legally with a proper visa, you must:
    • A – Show up to the station one week after arriving and give your name
    • B – Go to the station twice, the first time to show your paperwork and the second to get finger-printed.
    • C – Fill out documentation online and pay two fees. Go to the station at least three times because the online paperwork will not print. On the fourth try, be informed that you are now later than 30 days so you have to pay another fee. Get fingerprinted digitally and in ink. Have a head shot taken. Sign multiple documents. Provide certified copies of other documents. Return for a fifth time to make sure everything is kosher.
    • D – You don’t need to go to the Polícia Federal; you can check in at Customs at the airport.
  10. The event everyone wouldn’t shut up about was:
    • A – Samba Manaus
    • B – Rock in Rio
    • C – Children’s Day

I have more, but I can’t think of them right now! I will post the answers soon, along with explanations for everything I mentioned. Post your answers in the comments section before the results go up!

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Filed under Brazil, funny, immigration, Itacoatiara, pop quiz, red tape

My Brazilian Family(s)

Here in Brazil, I am being fully inducted into the culture through familial naturalization. I have a host family in Manaus which has all but adopted me and treats me as a daughter; but I also have a number of friends and co-workers with whom I’ve formed close, personal bonds in a very short span of time. True to Brazilian form, blood runs thick around here, although it doesn’t discriminate with genetics. Love, concern, trust, bickering, protectiveness: these are all present in my relationships.

For starters, my family in Itacoatiara has nothing to do with bloodlines. It doesn’t even run in chronological order, and the familial roles change on an hourly basis. In my classroom, I am the head of the family; I have to herd my students in the right direction, discipline them if they get out of line, and reward them with praise when they do well. Most of my students are teenagers, so I can see it in their eyes when they aren’t impressed with me confiscating their cell phones or reprimanding them for whispering (loudly) to each other in Portuguese when I’m trying to explain a grammar point. But I know they love me, even if I am tough on them sometimes – they know it’s for their own good!

Outside the classroom, sometimes I’m the child. As I’ve mentioned before, there are a lot of things I can’t do for myself. More realistically, I could do these things if I had to, but there are a few reasons why I don’t. First of all, as a lone, foreign female, I’m a target here for danger. This is something I know intellectually, but find hard to consider when I don’t see any immediate threats walking down the street at 10pm with friends. The other reason I don’t have to do things for myself is that Fisk organizes and pays for almost everything. This includes meals, residence, transportation, and even social events. Fisk is like Big Brother; it always has something in mind for me, regardless of whether I know about it or want to do it.

After Big Brother Fisk comes Fisk administration, the people who do all the dirty work that I’m not allowed to. In Itacoatiara, this is Eli.

A horrible photo of us, but that's what I have

He has to order my meals (I just get asked, “chicken or beef?” and then it arrives 20 minutes later), coordinate my travel with Manaus admin, and buy my bus tickets. He’s always worried something will happen to me – mostly because it’s his job to make sure I’m safe. The other day, I was with a bunch of friends at the school, and he came up and demanded my passport information “agora!” (now!). Everyone started laughing that he was my father, because I dejectedly went to my room to get it, but I knew he just needed it immediately because he had to catch a ride with someone else to get to the bus station, and it was late. Sometimes he yells at my friends who drive me around on their motorcycles because he thinks they aren’t good drivers…but again, I know this is because he recently had a death in the family from a motorcycle accident.

On the flip side, and more commonly, Eli and I are more like siblings. We look out for each other, we know when the other is upset or stressed or missing home, and we cheer each other up. Eliveuto is also away from home (he was transferred to Itacoatiara from Manaus just a month before me to fill a vacant spot), and I think he’s having a harder time with it than I am. I deal with homesickness too, but those times when I know he’s sad I feel like the big sister because I’m older and have more experience with being away from home.

One of my students, Karla, is a particular friend. She is only sixteen, but she likes to hang around the “older kids.” Some of our other friends have started calling her “Karla Maharaj” because she’s always around me!

Karla, on the right

It cracks me up. Hear that, Aleeta? You aren’t the baby anymore! Anyway, it’s nice to have her around. She speaks English pretty well (she’s in one of my advanced classes), except when she’s tired, and then she doesn’t understand a thing I say! Actually, Karla “babysat” me once when Eliveuto had to go back to Manaus. A., the coordinator, didn’t want me staying in the school alone so he asked her to come stay with me. She had to bring her mother into the school so A. could introduce me and prove she wasn’t making it up. Poor Karla!

My other “sisters” in Itacoatiara, or more accurately my girlfriends, are Priscila and Nancy. They both work at Fisk so they speak English quite well. Pri spent five months in Canada in a small town near Red Deer, Alberta when she was in grade 10, so it’s nice to be able to talk to someone who understands my comparisons with home.

All my girls: Pri on the left, Nancy and baby Sofia, and Karla

She understands when I say I want a “grande” coffee I’m talking Starbucks size, not the whole Dixie cup instead of half. She’s nineteen but very mature for her age. Nancy is in my class with Karla. She’s twenty, but she’s married and has a baby girl named Sofia. Cutest baby ever! These three ladies are my female gang in Itacoatiara.

A "family-sized" pizza for our conversation dinner: Hudy, Pri, and Pedro

This post wouldn’t be complete without a mention of my “assistant,” Pedro. Pedro is officially in the class with Nancy and Karla, but he is taking full advantage of my being here and sits in on two or three other classes as well – which means I see him at least once a day. I love Pedro: the guy always comes in with a smile, whether it’s 8 am or 9 pm. He’s good-humoured and helpful in the lower level classes, and is very dedicated to learning the language, despite maintaining a busy full course load in Chemistry. He told me he may have a big job opportunity in the near future which would require him to do an English exam, so I’ll help him as much as I can with that. He was also the one responsible for suggesting an extra conversation class for our advanced class, which has turned into very fun dinners every Thursday night (we talk about all kinds of things…Brazilians are not very academic outside of class, if you know what I mean).

Ary at the entrance to the school

A. is the coordinator for Fisk Itacoatiara, and he is very much like a parent to all the kids who grow up attending English classes. He knows everybody by name, greets the kids with a kiss and a hug, teases girls about their boyfriends, and is generally very jovial and committed to his job. He is my Portuguese teacher, and I have no complaints about spending three hours a week in his company. He speaks excellent English, due to a lot of effort on his part: he works all day in English, then goes home and reads English books and watches English TV. He told me sometimes he forgets Portuguese because he barely ever uses it!

I think that sums up the main characters in Itacoatiara. I will have to do another post to talk about my students (the ones that I’m not friends with). On to Manaus.

I’ve given an overview of my host family, but this week I’ve had more time to spend with Camilla and her father Marcos. I sleep in Camilla’s room when I’m here, so we are like sisters in that regard anyway, but this past Saturday I really got to see her in action when we went to the mall. Oh my goodness, I had forgotten what it’s like to be fifteen! I have two younger sisters, but for Kel it’s been a while since she was that age, and when Aleeta was fifteen I was away at university. Camilla and her friends were so funny though, I could barely keep up with them.

Camilla (right) and her friend Melissa at her Quize Anos

When I got to the mall they were in a movie, so I did my own thing for a bit before meeting up with them. There were four of them, but the group somehow just kept growing…and it took forever to decide to go anywhere, but once we did it was a mad dash up escalators and through crowded corridors – and then we’d get to the opposite end of the mall and they’d change their mind. And even though I have come to understand quite a bit of Portuguese, there is no way my brain can keep up with their tongues. I know I was the exact same when I was that age, but thinking back that far is frightening (god, I am old now haha).

Marcos, my host father, took Camilla and her friend Ana Clara and I out for churrasco on Friday night. He scolded me for not calling him on Monday like I said I was going to (although I have a chip (SIM card), it’s been on the fritz and only sometimes allows me to make a call). He said he knows I’m twenty-four, but he considers me a daughter now and he will worry about me like he worries about Camilla. The next day he gave me a new chip with minutes and texts and told me to keep in touch. Lesson learned!

(Sidenote: the second we set foot in the Churrascaria, the waiters figured out I was Canadian and got really excited. They then proceeded to foist every kind of meat on me (yes it’s their job, but when they tell you “It’s good! Try this!” you have to accept), attempted to educate me on the different cuts of meat and where they come from on the cow with a diagram, and brought me special servings of sushi just for my enjoyment. It was cute, but man was I full afterwards!)

Now comes the part where I tell you about my crazy international gang. These guys are my brothers in the truest sense: they honestly forget I am a girl 99% of the time. Vinicius is a Fisk employee, and a Brazilian. He picks me up at the bus station when I get back from Itacoatiara on Fridays, and he has been put in charge of taking the other intern and I to the federal police to register. He also picked me up from the airport with Leilson, so he is literally the first person I met in Brazil. Vinicius’s best friend is Paul, an Irishman who moved here with his Brazilian wife about 16 months ago, and who works at Fisk. Paul is soooo Irish.  He curses all the time, he bitches and moans about being in Brazil because he’s

Cristina and her fiance Vinicius, Paul, and Albert at the Forro club

homesick, he has an awesome accent, etc. Most of the time when the three of us are in the car together, I just sit back and listen to them rag on each other and cry with laughter. Our fourth gang member is Albert, the American intern. Albert is a hard character to pin down; he wasn’t very well-liked at Fisk initially, because he has a very dry personality and a slow, southern accent to go with it. But, as he’s spent more time with the three of us, he’s starting to loosen up and gain a sense of humour – or at least, project it outwardly. On Friday he told us that, since we were going to check out a forró club, he had taken the initiative to book a dance class! Ohhh the boys ate that one up. So when we went out on Saturday night we all just waited, cameras ready, for him to do his thing. What a guy, he has two left feet and a broom down his back.

I’ve posted some photos already of my Fisk Parque 10 family, so I won’t go into detail about that today. Hopefully you enjoyed meeting the “characters” in my life, and real family, I hope you aren’t offended that I’ve been adopted here, as well! After all, family is culture in Brazil.

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Filed under community, family, friends, Itacoatiara, Manaus

Ping Pong

Swimming at the Itacoatiara school with Eli and Lee

I mean this both literally and figuratively.  First things first: last Sunday, when I got to Itacoatiara, the boys (Lee and Eli) and I played several rounds of ping pong on the outdoor table at the school.  I think I surprised all of us when I was actually kind of good…and they realized I’m competitive by nature, so we made things interesting: whoever lost a round had to do five pushups (situps for me…I really can’t even do a yoga vinyasa properly).  And for the next round, they had to do ten pushups, and so on.  So it got pretty intense, and we kept intentionally miscounting each other’s reps, and eventually we gave up for laughing.  So ping pong is now sort of an inside joke!

The figurative meaning would be me as the ball, and a decent stretch of the Amazon river as the table, with Fisk bearing the paddles.  I’m going to be bouncing back and forth between the two schools for the next 4.5 months.  I’m not complaining; in fact, having been to, taught, and made friends in both places, I really can’t say I’d prefer it another way.  It does mean the flow of my time in each place gets interrupted, and I’d love to have more time to hang out with people on my days off…but I’m kind of greedy, so I want both.

A new aspect for me in Manaus is my homestay family.  When I got back to Manaus on Friday, I went to Fisk long enough to eat some lunch, then I was whisked away by my new family!  There is a girl named Camilla, who is 15, and a boy named Matteus, who is 17, as well as a mother, Adriana, and a father, Marcos.  They have two cats, one of which was fresh from the vet where she’d had major surgery.  The two cats now have to be kept in separate rooms, as the injured one is cranky and the fight like…well, cats!  The family (and now I) live on the 18th floor of a high-rise apartment, which has amazing views of Manaus.  On a clear day you can see the Rio Negro from the balcony, and the night-time panorama is gorgeous.  I think this family is quite well-off, as they have all the latest gadgets and the kids have had a pretty expensive English education at Fisk their whole lives, so I’m getting a whole different perspective on the city with them.  (By the way…they even have showers with a hot water option – muito chique!)

Adriana has made it very clear to me that I should consider the house my own, and I’m free to get food for myself whenever I want, go out, do laundry etc.  In exchange, I am to exclusively speak English with the kids.  Meanwhile, she speaks only Portuguese and isn’t planning on learning English, so I’ll have to practice my Portuguese to communicate with her.  Fortunately she is very easy to understand; the kids told me that, when they went to Panama, everybody understood her Portuguese though she didn’t have a word of Spanish (apparently this wasn’t true for the rest of the family)!  During the two and a half days I’ve spent with them so far, it has been very comfortable.

On Friday, Adriana dropped Camilla and me off at Manauara, the biggest and nicest of the “shoppings” in Manaus.  I told her I was in search of black pants and shoes to wear to work, so with that mission we set out through a bunch of the women’s clothing stores in the four-storey mall.  I didn’t have any luck finding pants, but it was also a struggle to figure out my size here.  They go by European sizes, but I know what my size should be and it wasn’t fitting right.  She introduced me to Bob’s Shakes, which is, as one would expect, a milkshake stand.  We got Ovaltine flavoured shakes, Camilla’s favourite.  Then, we headed to the movie theatre in the mall to meet up with her friend, Diana.  Diana has been studying English, and is going to Canada (Vancouver) in January, so she was eager to meet me.  The three of us went to a movie…and to my surprise, they picked a Brazilian movie out of a lineup of English movies with Portuguese subtitles.  I was a little worried about how I would get through 90 minutes of Portuguese, but it turns out comedy is funny in any language.  I actually followed the plot with no problem, and laughed at most of the jokes!  I’m glad to know I’m at least perceptive enough, if not linguistically equipped, to understand film.  After the movie, Camilla and Diana helped me buy a SIM card for my phone, and then a pair of black flats for work.  They aren’t anything special, but the price was right and they fit, so I’m happy for now.

At around eight, we left the mall and found Adriana in the grocery store (Carrefour) next door.  It was a pretty familiar sight…it looked just like Loblaw’s in Canada.  We went back to the apartment, where we had a late supper and the parents asked me some questions about home.  I had a glass of wine with dinner, and that combined with lack of sleep and a headache meant I went to bed almost immediately after eating at around 11:30.

It was a good thing I slept early, as I had to get up for work at 6:15 the next morning.  My classes start at 7:45 and I should be there at least fifteen minutes early.  Camilla is in my first class, so Adriana was going to drive us…but we left really late!  I ended up getting there closer to eight :S.  Ah well, that’s what happens when you’re dependent on other people.  I swear I was ready on time for once!  Luckily, I was teaching a class I’d already taught earlier in the week, so I was familiar with the material, and as it was the first day, we spent the first half hour doing an icebreaking activity.

My Saturday class schedule is kind of brutal, actually.  I have class solidly from 7:45am through to 3:30pm, which worried me at first because there is no scheduled lunch break.  I found out though that Mary Jane, who is administration at Fisk Parque 10, just orders the staff lunch and we carve out a half hour lunch between the second and third classes.  I spent lunch and the breaks chatting with the English teachers I hadn’t yet met.  They had lots of comments and advice for me about living in Manaus and Brazil, the most important of which was probably the rundown of Brazilian soccer team stereotypes.  I won’t repeat them on here (if you know you know), but it didn’t actually make it easier for me to choose a team.  Everyone keeps saying they’re going to buy me a shirt from their team so I will have to like it!  I think I’m leaning toward Flamengo, the team for which Ronaldinho Gaúcho plays (shhhhh!  Don’t tell anyone, or they’ll yell at me!).

Fisk Parque 10 Family (Manaus)After classes were finished, I hung around the school until 5:30 because we were having a “surprise” birthday party for Lee.  Just like my students (oh and I’d have to say family :P) in Canada, everyone thinks the surprisee has no idea they’re getting a party…even though they do it for everyone.  This is the second Fisk birthday I’ve been to!  Anyway, Lee is now a friend, so I was glad I could be there for it.  Mr. H., the director, came back for the party too as Lee is his right-hand man.  He made a big long speech in Portuguese (which I half understood) for Lee, and then Lee made a big long speech, and it was all very touching (more so if I’d known what they were saying, but you get the gist when people start tearing up).  We sang happy birthday in English and Portuguese, then I added French just for the heck of it (could have added Italian too, but that would have been going too far and my vocal (in)abilities were already revealing themselves).  Then the photos began, and I finally had an excuse to whip out my camera and get some photos for you!

My host family came to pick me up after that, so I had to leave the party quickly.  We returned to the apartment, and I had some time to relax and unwind.  At around 7:30, some of Matteus’ friends showed up.  They invited me to go down to the “playground,” the outdoor activities centre for the apartment complex, to play soccer.  Play futebol with Brazilian teenagers barefoot in a tennis court and get my ass kicked?  Why yes, I think I will!  It was actually very fun, and I didn’t embarrass myself too badly unless you count not knowing the rules of tennis court soccer, especially considering I am older, less fit, and less Brazilian than the rest of them.  Afterwards we all sat down in a circle (everyone’s feet were black from running around), and they all kind of stared at me.  I keep having these moments where I realize these people have never seen a Canadian in their life and they are full of questions.  These kids were too shy to ask, and the ones who knew some English refused to use it.  So Matteus and Camilla acted as translators, and they asked the usual run of questions such as what I eat, what’s the weather like, what music do I listen to, etc.  My favourite question by far was, “What’s the difference between ‘Oh shit’ and ‘bullshit’?” hahahaha

The kids decided to go out to eat after that, but as I was sweaty and tired from teaching all day, I declined to join them.  I finally got a chance to Skype with my family, and then I just relaxed for a couple hours before hitting the sack.  Not very exciting for a Saturday night, but I’d worked a very long day!

On Sunday morning, Camilla slept in, while I woke up early and lounged around on the computer and reading a book.  Then we had breakfast (lots of sugary and fatty bread-type things, sweet coffee, and some fruit).  After breakfast I was relieved to be able to sort through my luggage and unpack some of my stuff.  Camilla had cleared some space in her closet, and I did some laundry. I showed her some of the stuff I’d brought with me, we looked at pictures, and I painted our nails.  It was finally starting to feel like a living situation, and not temporary!

Alas, after lunch it was time to return to Itacoatiara.  Matteus and Marcos took me to the bus station, where I boarded the bus for my four-hour trip back to my weekday life. This time, I brought with me a small suitcase full of things that will stay there, so it, too can feel like a permanent living situation.  As crazy as it sounds, I don’t think I would change this strange split-life; I have friends and “family” in two cities here in Manaus, and I couldn’t choose between them if I wanted to!

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Filed under cheesy metaphors, friends, Itacoatiara, Manaus, something new